What You Need to Know About Ethereum’s Muir Glacier Update

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Ethereum celebrated 2020 the only way a blockchain knows how — with a network upgrade.

The Muir Glacier network upgrade (hard fork) was activated at block number 9,200,000 on Jan 2, 2020, with one Ethereum Improvement Proposal (EIP). EIP 2384 effectively delays the difficulty bomb for another 4,000,000 blocks (~611 days).

While other network upgrades and subsequent changes to the difficulty bomb have been accompanied by a change of ether issuance, there was no reduction in the Muir Glacier upgrade so the issuance will remain at 2 ETH per block.

What is the Ethereum difficulty bomb/ice age?

The history of the difficulty bomb and why it exists

So the difficulty bomb was, in part, encoded in to force regular hard forks as a way to normalize the idea of upgrading the network. This naturally has also provided opportunities to make other protocol upgrades. Typically, the difficulty bomb has been reset in conjunction with making other protocol changes, so it has arguably worked quite well up to now.

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Coins Kaufen: Bitcoin.deAnycoinDirektCoinbaseCoinMama (mit Kreditkarte)Paxfull

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Lending / Zinsen erhalten: Celsius NetworkCoinlend (Bot)

Cloud Mining: HashflareGenesis MiningIQ Mining

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