Are Rare Coins Right For Your Investment Portfolio?

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Now, as in the past, humankind collected things of beauty and historical importance; many times for its intrinsic eye appeal rather than strict investment. Many consider some forms subjective art – 60’s muscle cars, thimble collections, or Elvis plates – others have the consensus and are considered fine art – masters and impressionist paintings, architecture and sculpture.

One inherent drawback of these investments was always trying to recoup a cash value when you are ready to sell. In today’s market, you must plan to hit the correct timeframe to place these art forms in the proper auction; or hit an upside in the Real Estate Market. Because of this historically most people invested their money in stocks, bonds, or other liquid investment instruments. They were relatively easy to buy, held or increased in value, and could be sold without much effort; of course that was before the last few years of investment market gyrations. In the modern world if GM is having a problem (which of course it is), then every other car maker is affected. Ask the owners of BMW in Germany, a healthy, profitable, car maker if they are happy about its stock price; it shows very little relation to the value and profitability of the parent company.

The collectibles market for coins has many of the pluses of the true investment type of portfolio and garners many of the qualities of the art market. For years this was not actually true; before the advent of consistent, objective coin grading the coin collector was entirely at the mercy of either his/her own experience in the field, or ardent trust in the dealers they purchased from. Nowadays, the reputable grading services, such as PCGS, PNG, NGC, et al, a collector can have complete confidence in the coin he/she buys. Just like Sotheby or Christie vetting a painting as being done by a particular painter, the coins‘ grading service assure you the coin is not a counterfeit, as not been restored with caustic chemicals, and as a big bonus the grade quality of that particular coin. Using a scale of 1-70 the coin is examined by experts, and protectively encased in a holder; that holder not only protects the coin, but prevents future environmental damage that may affect the coins value.

Having these assurances of quality and value enables you to gauge the real present value of the coin you are buying. As you hold your coin through the years, the value can be monitored thanks to the efforts of the Professional Coin Grading Service and the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation; they maintain current coins values both online and in printed literature most times with weekly, or even daily, updates.

If your tastes run to Gold Coins you also have the natural value of gold to back your coin. One should realize that while a St Gaudens Double Eagle is stamped by the U.S. Government with a value of $20.00; it contains over $900.00 worth of gold using the latest values. Again, the true value is in its antique, collectible price and that depending upon the date/mint and therefore rarity; and this may vary thousands of dollars. For instance, a $20 Gold St Gaudens from 1916, struck at the San Francisco Mint, sells for around $3200.00 – that same coin sold for 20% less a few years ago. And you can sell that coin in a few days to any number of dealers; while checking the price on the Internet in minutes. All this done with complete transparency. Besides, you always also have the option of selling at one of the hundreds of coin auctions or shows throughout the country for an on-the-spot deal for possibly more money.

Basically, buy what you like – coins are literally small pieces of both art and history. Recently there was an offering of an 1865 3-dollar piece. The coin struck as a „pattern“ in copper – why – because at the end of the Civil War the costs were so massive the government could not mint certain coins in gold – they had none. Remember this was before the current „print more“ mentality of the government. Being a pattern meant the officials would be looking at it to approve before minting in mass. Theoretically, Abraham Lincoln may have handled this particular coin, or at the very least, it went through the hands of Treasury Secretary Chase. The decision was to stay with the Gold $3 piece; but only 1,065 for the whole country were minted because of the tight budget. Either in Gold or one of the rarer patterns in copper is a unique, beautiful piece of art and history.

The thought that a 1795 One Cent piece was in circulation while our Constitution was debated in Philadelphia gives chills when you handle the coin. Just think who may have held that coin!

Find a dealer you can work with, set a budget, and acquire coins that mean something to you. The fact that they will probably gain value over the years is secondary. Just look at the great collections – they are usually sold after the collector dies. You can be sure there will be greater inner conflict sell your treasures that it was to buy them.

Free Bitcoins: FreeBitcoin | BonusBitcoin

Coins Kaufen: Bitcoin.deAnycoinDirektCoinbaseCoinMama (mit Kreditkarte)Paxfull

Handelsplätze / Börsen: Bitcoin.de | KuCoinBinanceBitMexBitpandaeToro

Lending / Zinsen erhalten: Celsius NetworkCoinlend (Bot)

Cloud Mining: HashflareGenesis MiningIQ Mining

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